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Lumps and Bumps: Routine Visits Pay Off

Cat Being Examined by Owner
Talk to Your Veterinarian

Have you been maintaining your pet's preventive care visits? If your pet has not been receiving annual examinations, now is the time to do so,  to ensure optimal health for your pet.

While many lumps and bumps are benign, some can present serious health implications for your pet.

Wouldn't you want to know if something was getting in the way of your pet's health?

When was the last time your pet visited the veterinarian? If you answered "not in a while," it is time to book your next appointment. Have you recently discovered a lump or bump on your pet? Don't let that new discovery go unexamined.  While it may be completely benign, it is essential for your pet's health to make an appointment with your veterinarian soon after discovery. Ruling out health concerns such as tumors, cysts, and infections will help to keep your pet healthy.

Discovering and Diagnosing Lumps and Bumps

Without regular veterinary visits, subtle illnesses such as pet lumps and bumps can go unnoticed and develop into more serious health concerns such as cancers, arthritic conditions, and infections. When you brush and groom your pet, feel around behind ears, along the neckline, underneath their bellies and along legs and joints for wounds, lumps, and bumps.

Your groomer can help discover things you may miss. Furrier animals can hide lumps and bumps for a long time without anyone noticing until the animal becomes sick. While many pet owners consider grooming a pampering ritual for pets, it could be life-saving, especially when you choose a groomer who works in an environment with a veterinarian on site.

What to Look for on Your Pet

There are many types of masses, but a lipoma is the most common lump found on pets. This soft, round or flat, and painless lump presents just under your pet's skin and is generally benign, although, rarely a liposarcoma is found. More of a problem though, is that mast cell tumors, a type of skin cancer, can look and feel just like a lipoma.  Because of this, it is always best for your pet's overall wellness to have these lumps and bumps accurately evaluated and diagnosed.

Occasionally benign masses can grow into other surrounding tissues. While the actual lump itself is not a concern, the tissue it can disrupt sometimes is problematic. The mass may affect the way a limb moves, or an eyelid closes. In some cases lumps must be removed surgically, and removing them early is the key.

Sources:
Goodman Lee, Jessica, “Lumps & Bumps: Team Training Plan.” Veterinary Team Brief, 2013.

Exclusive Offer

Welcome to South Coastal Animal Health

Dr. Grace Strake DVM, Dr. Lori Harvey DVM, Dr. Liz Czaplicki DVM, Dr. Sandra Tam-Brinker DVM, 
Dr. Sophie Johnstone DVM, Dr. Colleen Mead DVM, Dr. Kim Fortier Leidl DVM

South Coastal Animal Health opened it's doors in July of 2006. Privately owned and operated by Dr. Grace Strake, SCAH is a state of the art veterinary practice with a personal touch. Unlike larger hospitals, at South Coastal you will develop a one on one relationship with the doctors and the staff. We offer comprehensive animal health care ranging from preventative medicine and vaccinations to intensive care cases and involved surgical procedures. At South Coastal we pride ourselves on our top quality care, modern, fully equipped facility and friendly, knowledgeable staff.

Your Pets . . . Our Family!

We are open for appointments Monday - Saturday and can handle some emergencies normal business hours.

If you'd like one of our staff members to contact you please fill out your information below and we will get back to you as soon as possible!

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